Just Another Manic Sunday

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Cool, clear, classic Clackamas River

 

Dawn broke clear and cool over the upper Clackamas River drainage after an impromptu camping trip amid the teeming hordes escaping the metro area.  Every campground was full for miles.  So it goes.  It was a great morning to look at clear water, tall trees, and mossy rocks.  Then there was the low waterline at Detroit Lake, living the late summer reservoir life of stumps and marinas in the mud.  We did a lot of walking, although we didn’t end up taking a serious hike.  We simple went with the flow, something at which I do not always excel.  We found gorgeous spots of placid river, and soaked up views from the dam at the foot of Detroit Lake. Ten to fifteen fishermen cast their lines right off the top of the dam.  Some of them were even successful.  Pretty cool.

Once we got out of the foothills, we had a decision to make.  We could go to a popular hiking area like Silver Falls or Opal Creek, but we opted instead to do something a bit more unique, based on the classic on-the-fly smart phone search.  Onward to Willamette Mission State Park!  It was there that Jason Lee established a Methodist mission in 1834, two decades before Oregon was even a state, and survival had to come before any conversion of Native Americans.  The part comprises almost 900 acres of river, lakes, orchards, and open fields. It’s just over an hour from home, yet I’d never visited.  Time to change that.

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The edge of Goose Lake

 

Once in the park, we walked the short trail to the of Goose Lake, then drove to the viewing spot of the nation’s largest Black Cottonwood, which is not incredibly tall in comparison to redwoods or Douglas firs, but boy, that trunk is massive!

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Denise soaking up the wisdom of the tree

 

One of the cool things the park does is create what they term a ghost structure, which duplicates the basic shape of the original mission buildings.  The structure was built close to the riverbank,  and mosquitoes were a big problem, along with malaria.   Not such a great spot, as it turns out.  The mission moved to Chemeketa, now known as Salem, in 1840.  Ironically, an 1861 flood ravaged the area, and the main river channel moved further west.  The water below the ghost structure is now a landlocked lake most of the year.

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The ghost structures

The trails were pretty, and dotted with nut trees and apple trees.  There were many walnut trees, and a lot of a few other species, which probably included filbert trees.   A few deer darted through the area, perhaps looking to nosh on some apples.

 

Once we left the orchard area, we discovered a path to the Willamette River itself, on a quiet rocky beach with calm water that instantly make me think of Huckleberry Finn.  I skipped a few rocks, which Jackie wanted to chase.  Sorry, not a ball, buddy.

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I swear Huck left his raft here somewhere

 

It was a lovely spot, and the temperature was perfect.  Just visible downstream was the Wheatland Ferry.  It seemed such an quaint anachronism that we had to take it.Such happenstance led us to Dayton, a cute little town which was apparently founded by Joel Palmer, part of the Barlow Road entrepreneurial team and namesake of the Palmer snowfield and chairlift at famed Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood.  We also chowed on great burgers at the Block House Café.  Then came the Sunday afternoon traffic issues, part of which was caused by a pair of tractors on the highway, which seemed humorous yet fitting in Oregon’s wine country, and a fitting capstone for the day.

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Rather pretty if I do say so.  Note the cabin on the far left.

About Josh Baker

"The world is big and I want to have a good look at it before it gets dark.” ― John Muir

Posted on August 28, 2016, in Adventure, Camping, Flora and Fauna, General Hiking, Hiking with dogs, Historical sites, Mountains, Outdoors, Photography, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. A beautiful little trip.

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