Sandia Range, part two: Kiwanis Cabin

Sandia Range

No running with scissors here

After riding a tram to the top of the Sandia Range, as documented in my last post, I was confronted with some tough choices as a hiker.  It felt like the ad for a certain mini market chain:  Too much good stuff!   Luckily, an obvious hiking target arose quickly in the Kiwanis Cabin. It was visible a mile to the north along the edge of the ridge.  It looked like a spectacular vantage point for photos.

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Denise leaving the tram area. Note the manmade stone wall lining the trail

The first part of the Crest Trail heads at a casual pitch north of the area where the Sandia Peak Tram and the Sandia Peak Ski Area abut.In just a few steps there is a junction.  The route to the left plunges into the abyss, clinging tenuously to the rocky scarp.  It reminded me a great deal of the upper third of the Bright Angel Trail in The Grand Canyon.   A misstep in certain spots would send a hiker tumbling hundreds of feet.  We were worried about our pup darting after a squirrel or bird, so we turned back toward the intersection and turned up the Crest Trail.

Looking down like a bird

Looking down like a bird

There is a nature trail loop, but we stayed on the main trail, which offers a few stellar views to the west as we walked on limestone with what appeared to be fossils embedded.  Denise wore cowgirl boots, and Jackie Chan was getting over being sick, so they turned around at one especially windy open slope.

Crazy limestone.   What is embedded in it? Fossils?

Crazy limestone. Disparate elements seem to be embedded in it.  Fossils?

Viewpoint near where I bashed my head

Viewpoint near where I bashed my head on a sharp branch.  Headache!

After promising to hike quickly and return, I forged ahead in the woods, few other hikers nearby.  Once I hit the other trails coming from the north, foot traffic started increasing.

The alpine meadow near the top

Not a great shot but it gives a feel for the alpine meadow near the top

The route to the Kiwanis Cabin takes sections of a few trails to curve around a lovely alpine meadow mostly blocked off by split-rail fences.  Apparently there once were multiple trails crossing the open area, but they were abused, and alpine areas take a long time healing from clumsy hikers and bikers, so the area was closed for restoration.

The final section of path above the meadow neatly fenced

The final section of path above the meadow neatly fenced

The Kiwanis Cabin,  all dressed in white

The Kiwanis Cabin, all dressed in white, the world at its feet

The hike is short anyway, and it was worth it to reach the sweeping views at the Kiwanis Cabin.  The stone house was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s as part of the New Deal to get people jobs and teach them skills.  Mount Hood has a number of CCC huts built in the same time frame, a couple of which are still out there near the Timberline Trail.

Looking toward Albuquerque just below the hut

Just below the hut, looking toward Albuquerque

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View from on high

View from on high

The Kiwanis Cabin was a casual 1.5 miles from the tram’s upper terminal. There is one short section where the trail climbed steadily and dealt with significant roots and rocks.   Most hikers would be fine here, although the elevation might make it feel tiring.

As my camera has dropped-by-owner disease, not all of my photos came out well.  Hopefully in the next week or so I will purchase a new camera.

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Taken on the walk back. What an area.

Great views in most directions

Great views in most directions

New Mexico Maple.   Who knew?

New Mexico Maple seems more like a Japanese Maple. Who knew?

The Sandia Range is beautiful, easily accessible for most people, yet very rugged.  This is highly recommended for any who want a classic island in the sky experience.  There is nothing like being in a green forest and looking thousands of feet down at a brown and red desert landscape.

We reconnect on the rocks near the tram terminal.

We reconnect on the rocks near the tram terminal.

About Josh Baker

"The world is big and I want to have a good look at it before it gets dark.” ― John Muir

Posted on July 31, 2013, in Adventure, Alpine Hiking, Hiking with dogs, Mountains, Navigation, Outdoors, vacations and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. She’s brave hiking in those boots! I’d be afraid for my ankles and of blisters.
    Absolutely gorgeous views. Love the limestone and fence.

  2. I love seeing a hiker and their dog. Your pictures are beautiful and I must know where Sandia Range is. So where did you hike this gem?

  3. Seems like a great hike!

  4. Before you get a new camera, you really need to get Denise some better hiking shoes! Awesome views, thanks for sharing.

    • Actually, she has good hiking boots. She’s comfortable in cowboy boots most of the time. Besides, her grandfather was a cowboy from New Mexico…. Thanks for popping by, Carol.

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